Photo by Mallory

Photo by Mallory


Today is another day on our life's journey.

Perhaps here you can find encouragement

for wherever your journeys may take you.

Welcome to my thinking place where you can

read insightful posts.

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Monday, December 29, 2014

Baby Boomer Bust



I plan to post here on Lifelines every Monday. Some posts may be humorous but all will be insightful. I hope you find this blog inspiring and entertaining, perhaps finding a nugget of wisdom to help you in days to come. In the right sidebar you can sign up to follow the blog and never miss when a new post goes up. Also in the right sidebar you can join my mailing list and receive my newsletter, which has a book giveaway in each issue.



BABY BOOMER BUST



"Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter." —Mark Twain


According to various researchers, the last baby boomers turned 50 this year. Next month, the Gen Xers begin turning 50. Ten thousand people a day are turning 65, and that will continue for the next 16 years.

Baby boomers are people born during the Post World War II baby boom between the years 1946 and 1964. Seventy-six million American children were born between 1945 and 1964. One survey found that nearly a third of baby boomers polled in the United States would prefer to pass on their inheritance to charities rather than pass it down to their children.

In America, Baby boomers control over 80% of personal financial assets and more than half of all consumer spending. They buy 77% of all prescription drugs, 61% of over-the-counter drugs, and 80% of all leisure travel. They comprised the first generation to grow up with TV; popular Boomer-era shows included The Brady Bunch, Gilligan's Island, The Twilight Zone, The Ed Sullivan Show, and Happy Days.

If you’re a baby boomer, do you fit within the descriptive facts above? Growing up a baby boomer, did you ever think about being 50 or older? Probably not. Senior citizens I’ve talked to didn’t give thought to being old—ever. It’s just something that youth don’t usually consider.


With each tick of the clock we all do age and that’s one of the things

over which we have no control. Some say age is just a number and the important thing is one’s state of mind—whether we allow our years to make us behave young or old. Some folks display a perpetual youthful attitude and their personality refuses to grow old.

That’s admirable. I want that personality. How about you? Do you let your age define you?


Monday, December 22, 2014

Wishing Doesn't Make It So



I plan to post here on Lifelines every Monday. Some posts may be humorous but all will be insightful. I hope you find this blog inspiring and entertaining, perhaps finding a nugget of wisdom to help you in days to come. In the right sidebar you can sign up to follow the blog and never miss when a new post goes up. Also in the right sidebar you can join my mailing list and receive my newsletter, which has a book giveaway in each issue.
 

WISHING DOESN'T MAKE IT SO


"Regret is an appalling waste of energy; you can't build on it; it is good only for wallowing."
--Katherine Mansfield, New Zealand writer (1888-1923)

From Merriam-Webster Dictionary Online: "regret:
sorrow aroused by circumstances beyond one's control or power to repair."

Regret is not productive; it doesn't fix anything, it doesn't change anything. What it does is put our mind in a negative mode. And negative thinking has no good purpose. When we look back with regret to that guy or gal whom we wonder we should have married but didn't, does it change anything? No.

When we look back with regret to a time when we were at a forks in the road and now we think we took a wrong turn, does it change anything? No. We could go on and on looking back and wishing something from the past were different.

But regretting and wishing don't make it so. Let's don't spend much time on either of them. We'll just be taking time away from something good that is in store for us in the present. I've used this quotation before but here it is again. Eleanor Roosevelt said, "Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, and today is a gift; that's why they call it the present." Yesterday. Don't we know that today is yesterday's
future and yesterday is no more?

I read an excellent little book by Andy Andrews: The Noticer. Whether you're young or not-so-young, male or female, despondent or happy, this book is for you. Its underlying theme is looking at things with perspective. Andrews writes in the book that "sometimes all a person needs is a little perspective" and situations look a lot different, better. He writes about perspective in relation to regret.


Here's hoping we can shake off all that regret about something in our history and go forward to better things. We can't drive the car forward very well while looking in the rear view mirror.



Monday, December 15, 2014

Football? Are You Sure?


I plan to post here on Lifelines every Monday. Some posts may be humorous but all will be insightful. I hope you find this blog inspiring and entertaining, perhaps finding a nugget of wisdom to help you in days to come. In the right sidebar you can sign up to follow the blog and never miss when a new post goes up. Also in the right sidebar you can join my mailing list and receive my newsletter, which has a book giveaway in each issue.


 FOOTBALL? ARE YOU SURE?


"Be not the first by whom the new is tried,
Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
"
Alexander Pope, English writer (1688–1744)

A recent newspaper article mentioned that a small college would be closing their football program. I think that would be difficult to do with so much investment involved. There’s the established playing field and stadium, the practice field, the coaches’ positions and offices, the trainers, those who keep the playing field as perfect as possible, and on and on.

Many people depend on an existing football program. So many things would have to change in order to close down a current football program. And then don’t forget the fans.




On the other hand, a school (high school or college) that doesn’t already have a football program might do well to think judiciously before starting one. An increase in the number of football players who suffer concussions is documented. News reports show more long-term detrimental consequences of those head injuries than was once thought.

Are the fleeting moments when football players bask in the cheers of a roaring crowd a fair price to pay for possible monumental suffering later in life? Many players might answer that in the affirmative. Until they’re the ones to suffer.

So bottom line: if you have a football program in place, do you keep it to protect the investment? And if you don’t already have a football program there, should you decide against starting one to protect the young people who would play?

I’m glad I don’t have to make such decisions.

What has your experience been with football? Has a family member played?

Monday, December 8, 2014

Things or People?





I plan to post here on Lifelines every Monday. Some posts may be humorous but all will be insightful. I hope you find this blog inspiring and entertaining, perhaps finding a nugget of wisdom to help you in days to come. In the right sidebar you can sign up to follow the blog and never miss when a new post goes up. Also in the right sidebar you can join my mailing list and receive my newsletter, which has a book giveaway in each issue.


THINGS OR PEOPLE?


"What most people need to learn in life is how to love people and use things, instead of using people and loving things."
 —Author Unknown

Everybody didn’t wait until Black Friday to start Christmas shopping. The newspaper carried a photo taken at 7 a.m. Thanksgiving morning. In the front-page photo people lined up from the door and around the corner. I spent several minutes looking at that picture. It saddened me.

That photo is a testimony to how many in America

seem to value things as top priority. Another picture showed customers coming out of a store, pushing shopping carts piled high with their purchases—again, things!

The commonly heard phrase of some years ago, “Love makes the world go 'round,'” meant love among people. If that phrase is used today it would no doubt partly refer to love of things. Evidence abounds that shows we are a materialistic society.

Who of us would be content to live the simple life of the Waltons portrayed by the popular TV show? That extended family had very little beyond the necessities. What American family of that size could survive today with only one automobile? Or what family today would be happy unless each member had their own bedroom?

Is the learning curve too high or could we learn to love people and use things instead of the other way around?  How do you love people and use things?